The Best Algebra 1 Regents Review Guide for 2022 | Albert Resources (2024)

Passing the Algebra 1 Regents exam can be stressful for New York students. Students who pass the Algebra 1 Regents exam have a clear understanding of the exam’s format, topics, and expectations.

In this comprehensive post, we’ll review common questions about how to pass Algebra 1 Regents, outline every important test date, and wrap up with helpful Regents review notes and practice resources for you to start using.

Let’s get started!

The Best Algebra 1 Regents Review Guide for 2022 | Albert Resources (1)

What We Review

Algebra 1 Regents Exam Essentials

In this section, we’ll detail test-specific information about the Algebra 1 Regents exam. If you are still acclimating yourself to Regents, we recommend you first read our Algebra 1 Regents FAQ.

What’s the format of Algebra 1 Regents?

The Best Algebra 1 Regents Review Guide for 2022 | Albert Resources (2)

The Algebra 1 Regents exam includes 24 multiple choice questions and 13 constructed response questions. Each question is worth a specific number of points (called “credits”).

Every multiple choice question is worth 2 credits while the constructed response questions are worth either 2, 4, or 6 credits. When you take the Algebra 1 Regents exam, you’ll use pencil, pen, and paper – the exam is not available to be taken on a computer.

What topics are covered on the test?

The Best Algebra 1 Regents Review Guide for 2022 | Albert Resources (3)

The many topics assessed on the Algebra 1 Regents exam can be grouped into four broad conceptual categories. Here are those four conceptual categories listed in order of importance:

  • Algebra (50%-56% of the exam)
  • Functions (32%-38% of the exam)
  • (5%-10% of the exam)
  • (2%-8% of the exam)

Let’s dive into each one of these four conceptual categories:

Category #1: Algebra

The Algebra category includes a wide range of topics such as interpreting the structure of expressions, performing arithmetic operations on polynomials, and manipulating equations.

The Algebra category accounts for 50%-56% of the Algebra 1 Regents exam. This means students taking the Algebra 1 Regents exam are typically asked many questions in the Algebra category, so it’s very important to spend time reviewing and practicing topics in this category. Algebra is by far the most important conceptual category for you to master in order to pass the Algebra 1 Regents exam

To check how ready you are to pass the Algebra 1 Regents exam, consider the guiding questions below about concepts you should understand and skills you should master in the Algebra category. The comprehensive guiding questions below are based on New York State math standards from the Algebra 1 Regents test guide.

Concepts You Should Understand:

  • Can you interpret terms, factors, and coefficients in an expression?
  • Do you know what it means to find the “zeros” of a function?
  • Can you interpret parts of complicated expressions as single entities?
  • Can you recognize a “difference of squares”?
  • Do you understand the relationship between zeros and factors of a polynomial?
  • Can you read and understand the graph of an equation in two or more variables?
  • Can you interpret solutions as viable or non-viable options when modeling real-world situations?
  • Can you construct a viable explanation that justifies how to solve an equation?
  • Do you understand that the graph of an equation is the set of all its solutions?
  • Can you explain how to find the solution(s) to two graphs that intersect?
  • Can you prove that, in a system of two equations in two variables, replacing one equation with the sum of that equation and a multiple of the other equation produces a system with the same solution?

Skills You Should Master:

  • Can you rewrite complicated expressions into different forms?
  • Can you factor a quadratic expression to find its zeros?
  • Can you complete the square of a quadratic to find its maximum or minimum value?
  • Can you use exponent properties to transform expressions?
  • Can you add, subtract, and multiply different polynomials?
  • Can you use zeros to sketch a rough graph of a function defined by a polynomial?
  • Are you able to solve real-world problems by writing equations or inequalities with one variable?
  • Can you solve real-world problems by writing equations or inequalities with two (or more) variables?
  • Can you represent constraints on a situation using equations, inequalities, systems or equations, and systems of inequalities?
  • Can you rearrange formulas to solve for a specific quantity of interest?
  • Can you solve linear equations and inequalities one variable?
  • Can you solve quadratic equations in one variable?
  • Can you graph the solutions to a linear inequality in two variables (as a half-plane)?
  • Are you able to graph the solution set to a system of linear inequalities in two variables?
  • Can you solve systems of equations exactly (using algebra) and approximately (using graphs)?

Return to the Table of Contents

Category #2: Functions

The Functions category covers topics such as understanding basic function notation, interpreting functions in a real-world context, and analyzing functions across different representations.

The Functions category accounts for 32%-38% of the Algebra 1 Regents exam. There are many topics in the Functions category that require strong algebra knowledge, so students often review the Algebra and Functions categories together. Functions is the second most important conceptual category for you to master in order to pass the Algebra 1 Regents exam.

Below are some guiding questions about concepts you should understand and skills you should master in the Function category. The comprehensive guiding questions below are based on New York State math standards from the Algebra 1 Regents test guide.

Concepts You Should Understand:

  • Do you understand the definition of a function?
  • Can you describe what the “domain” and “range” of a function means?
  • Do you understand function notation?
  • Can you interpret statements that use function notation in a real-world context?
  • Do you recognize that sequences are functions whose domain is a subset of integers?
  • Can you interpret key features of graphs and tables in terms of the relationship between two quantities?
  • Are you able to select an appropriate domain of a function based on a real-life quantitative relationship?
  • Can you interpret the average rate of change of a function over a specified interval?
  • Can you compare properties of two functions represented in different ways (such as algebraically, graphically, numerically in tables, or by verbal descriptions)?
  • Are you able to identify the effect on a transformed graph for specific k values?
  • Can you identify whether a function is odd or even from its graph?
  • Can you recognize and explain when situations should be modeled by linear functions or with exponential functions?
  • Can you distinguish between situations showing exponential growth or decay?
  • Do you understand from graphs and tables that a quantity increasing exponentially will eventually exceed a quantity increasing linearly, quadratically, or a general polynomial function?
  • Given a real-life context, can you interpret the parameters in a linear or exponential function?

Skills You Should Master:

  • Can you evaluate a function for inputs in its domain?
  • Can you sketch graphs of a function based on verbal description of a relationship between two quantities?
  • Given a graph of a function, can you find the intercepts, intervals where the function is increasing, decreasing, positive, or negative, the relative maximums and minimums, symmetries, and end behavior?
  • Can you calculate the average rate of change of a function presented symbolically or as a table over a specified interval?
  • Can you estimate a function’s rate of change from a graph?
  • Can you graph functions expressed symbolically and show key features of a graph (by hand for simple cases and using calculator for complicated cases)?
  • Can you graph linear and quadratic functions showing intercepts, maxima, and minima?
  • Can you graph square root, cube root, and piecewise-defined functions (such as step functions and absolute value functions)?
  • When given a real-world scenario, can you use factoring and completing the square in a quadratic function to find and interpret the zeros, extreme values, and symmetry of a graph?
  • Given a relationship between two quantities, can you determine an explicit expression, a recursive process, or steps for calculation from a context?
  • Can you find the k value of a function given the original and transformed graphs?
  • Can you construct linear and exponential (including sequences) given a graph, a description of the relationship, or two input-output pairs?

Return to the Table of Contents

Category #3: Statistics & Probability

The Statistics & Probability category is focused primarily on interpreting linear models, including finding the slope and intercept of a real-life relationship, interpreting a correlation coefficient, and distinguishing between correlation and causation.

The Statistics & Probability category accounts for 5%-10% of the Algebra 1 Regents exam. This category is the third most important conceptual category for you to master in order to pass the Algebra 1 Regents exam.

Below are some guiding questions about concepts you should understand and skills you should master in the Statistics & Probability category. The comprehensive guiding questions below are based on New York State math standards from the Algebra 1 Regents test guide.

Concepts You Should Understand:

  • Can you interpret the slope (or rate of change) and the intercept of a linear model in the context of given data?
  • Can you distinguish between correlation and causation?
  • Can you understand the structure and meaning of a two-way frequency table?
  • Are you able to interpret relative frequencies in the context of the data?
  • Can you recognize possible associations and trends in data?
  • Accounting for possible effects of extreme data points (outliers), can you interpret differences in shape, center, and spread in the context of data sets?

Skills You Should Master:

  • Can you calculate and interpret the correlation coefficient of a linear model?
  • Can you summarize categorical data for two categories in a two-way frequency table?
  • Can you represent data with plots on the real number line including dot plots, histograms, and box plots?
  • Can you use statistics appropriate to the shape of data to compare center and spread of data sets?

Category #4: Number & Quantity

The Number & Quantity category includes topics such as quantitative reasoning, unit conversions, and using properties of rational or irrational numbers.

The Number & Quantity category accounts for 2%-8% of the Algebra 1 Regents exam. This category is the fourth most important conceptual category for you to master in order to pass the Algebra 1 Regents exam. Students taking the Algebra 1 Regents exam are generally not asked many questions in this category, but mastering the topics in Number & Quantity sets a solid foundation for future math courses.

Below are some guiding questions about concepts you should understand and skills you should master in the Number & Quantity category. The comprehensive guiding questions below are based on New York State math standards from the Algebra 1 Regents test guide.

Concepts You Should Understand:

  • Do you understand how to use units to help guide the solutions of multi-step problems?
  • Are you able to choose and interpret units consistently in formulas?
  • Can you choose and interpret the scale and origin in graphs and data displays?
  • Can you define appropriate quantities for descriptive modeling?
  • Do you understand how to select a reasonable level of accuracy when reporting quantities?

Skills You Should Master:

  • Can you find the sum and product of any combination of rational and irrational numbers?

So, what’s the bottom line?

As you can see, there is a wide range of topics covered on the Algebra 1 Regents exam – mostly focused on two key categories: Algebra and Functions.

The table below shows a full summary of all topics:

How many questions does Algebra 1 Regents have?

The Best Algebra 1 Regents Review Guide for 2022 | Albert Resources (5)

There are 37 questions on the Algebra 1 Regents exam split into 4 different parts. The first part of the exam is all multiple choice while the final 3 parts are all constructed responses. The exam has 24 multiple choice questions and 13 student-constructed response questions. Each question is worth a specific number of points (called “credits”).

See below for an overview of each part on the Algebra 1 Regents exam:

Exam Section

Question Type

Partial Credit Possible?

Number of Questions

Credits per Question

Total Credits

Part I

Multiple Choice

No

24

2

48

Part II

Constructed Response (short)

Yes

8

2

16

Part III

Constructed Response (medium)

Yes

4

4

16

Part IV

Constructed Response (long)

Yes

1

6

6

TOTAL

37

86

Return to the Table of Contents

What do Algebra 1 Regents questions look like?

The Best Algebra 1 Regents Review Guide for 2022 | Albert Resources (6)

Part I: Multiple Choice

Part I of the Algebra 1 Regents exam is where all of the multiple choice questions are asked. Multiple choice questions include 4 different answer options and should take you about 2-3 minutes each to complete.

You earn full credit for a correct answer (2 credits) or no credit for incorrect answers (0 credits). There is no partial credit earned on multiple choice questions.

In total, there are 24 multiple choice questions in Part I, each worth 2 credits.

Here’s an official example of a Part I question:

The Best Algebra 1 Regents Review Guide for 2022 | Albert Resources (7)

Source: Regents Algebra 1 Exam, August 2019, Question #1

Part II: Constructed Response

Part II of the Algebra 1 Regents exam includes 8 short constructed-response answers. This means you are provided a question prompt and an empty answer area in which to write, draw, and explain each answer. You can earn partial credit for these questions.

For all questions in this Part II, a correct numerical answer with no work shown will receive only 1 credit. Each constructed responses question in Part II is relatively short (Part II typically does not include multi-part prompts) and worth 2 credits each.

Here’s an official example of a Part II question:

The Best Algebra 1 Regents Review Guide for 2022 | Albert Resources (8)

Source: Regents Algebra 1 Exam, August 2019, Question #28

Part III: Constructed Response

Part III of the Algebra 1 Regents exam includes 4 medium constructed-response answers. These questions typically include multi-part prompts where students complete at least two different tasks within the same question. You can receive partial credit for answering one task correctly and the other incorrectly.

For all questions in Part III, a correct numerical answer with no work shown will receive only 1 credit. Each question in Part III is worth a maximum of 4 credits.

Here’s an official example of a Part III question:

The Best Algebra 1 Regents Review Guide for 2022 | Albert Resources (9)

Source: Regents Algebra 1 Exam, August 2019, Question #34

Part IV: Constructed Response

The final part of the Algebra 1 Regents exam, Part IV, generally includes the most difficult question on the entire exam. The one question in Part IV includes at least 3 different tasks at a relatively high level of difficulty. But, fear not! We have tips and tricks below to help you get full credit on every question.

On Part IV, a correct numerical answer with no work shown will receive only 1 credit. The Part IV question is worth 6 points, the most points of any question on the exam.

Here’s an official example of a Part IV question:

The Best Algebra 1 Regents Review Guide for 2022 | Albert Resources (10)

Source: Regents Algebra 1 Exam, August 2019, Question #37

A quick reminder:

For Parts II, III, and IV of the Algebra 1 Regents exam, a zero-credit response is completely incorrect, irrelevant, or incoherent or is a correct response that was obtained by an obviously incorrect procedure. To help you earn as many credits as possible, check out our3 hacks for the Constructed Response Questions on Regents Algebra 1 Exams.

Return to the Table of Contents

How long is the Algebra 1 Regents exam?

The Best Algebra 1 Regents Review Guide for 2022 | Albert Resources (11)

You are given a total of three hours to complete all parts of the exam. There are no official time periods required for each part of the exam, so you can use the three hours however you’d like. Students typically have more than enough time to finish the Algebra 1 Regents exam, so there is no need for you to rush through questions.

Wondering how much time you should spend on each section? Well, assuming you want to use the entire three hours of test time, here is what we suggest:

Exam Section

Question Type

Number of Questions

Minutes Per Question

Total Minutes

Part I

Multiple Choice

24

3

72

Part II

Constructed Response (short)

8

5

40

Part III

Constructed Response (medium)

4

12

48

Part IV

Constructed Response (long)

1

20

20

TOTAL

37

180

For multiple choice questions (Part I), we suggested you spend about 3 minutes on each question. For short constructed response questions (Part II), we suggest about 5 minutes on each question. For medium constructed response questions (Part III), we suggest about 12 minutes on each question. And for the one long constructed response question (Part IV), we suggest a full 20 minutes. These times are just estimates, so you should be sure to take multiple full-length practice exams to see what timing works best for you.

Pro tip: Albert offers exclusive full-length Algebra 1 Regents practice exams to build your confidence before test day!

Return to the Table of Contents

What can you bring to the Algebra 1 Regents test?

The Best Algebra 1 Regents Review Guide for 2022 | Albert Resources (12)

Feeling prepared for the Algebra 1 Regents exam can help ease test anxiety and set students up for success. We recommend that you pack a bag with exam essentials the night before your Regents exam so that you wake up feeling ready to ace the test!

Follow our lists on what to pack — and what NOT to pack — to build your own Algebra 1 Regents survival kit.

The Essential Algebra 1 Regents Packing List

  • Sharpened #2 pencils: You’ll need #2 pencils to bubble in your answer sheets for Part I of the Algebra 1 Regents exam and to create graphs and drawings for Parts II, III, and IV. We recommend bringing at least 3 sharpened pencils to get you through all 37 questions. If you prefer mechanical pencil, be sure to choose one with lead labeled “HB”, which is the same grade as #2.
  • Erasers: Don’t let a poorly erased answer lose you points on the exam. Bring a good eraser to your test and be sure to completely erase any changed answers or stray marks in your answer document. We’re begging you: leave the fun, novelty erasers at home. Instead, invest in a Paper Mate Pink Pearl or a Pentel Hi-Polymer eraser. You’ll thank us when your answer sheet is 100% smudge-free.
  • Black or blue pens: All work for Parts II, III, and IV of the Algebra 1 Regents exam (other than graphs and drawings) should be completed in black or blue pen. Do not use red ink in any part of the exam and do not attempt to erase any pen marks. If you make a mistake, cross your work out clearly and start again.
  • Student identification: Bring your student ID card or another form of ID so that your testing administrator can verify your identity. This is especially important if you’re taking the exam at a location other than the school you attend.
  • Graphing calculator: Students must have access to graphing calculators for the entire Algebra 1 Regents exam. While your school or testing facility will provide you with a graphing calculator, we recommend bringing one that you are accustomed to using. Just remember, your graphing calculator’s memory will be cleared before you take the exam.

    Check out these Regents graphing calculator guidelines to get familiar with the tasks you’ll be expected to perform. Plus, we’ve
    created a guide on graphing calculator tips and tricksto help you maximize your exam score.
  • Extra batteries: Remember, you’re allowed to use your graphing calculator for the entire Algebra 1 Regents exam. Don’t let your calculator die on you! Double check the type of batteries your calculator uses — most likely it will be 4 standard AAA batteries — and bring an extra set to have handy during the exam.
  • Ruler: Students are required to have access to a ruler for the entire Algebra 1 Regents exam. If you have a straightedge or ruler that you prefer to use, bring it along!
  • Watch: You have three hours to complete the Algebra 1 Regents exam. To help pace yourself, we recommend wearing a watch during the test. Just remember to leave smart watches with communication capabilities outside the exam room.
  • Exam invitation: Your school or testing facility might provide you with an “invitation” to the Algebra 1 Regents exam to help keep test day organized. If you receive an invitation, be sure it bring it with you to the test. If not, don’t worry! Not all schools use this system.
  • Snack: Don’t let hunger pangs distract you from doing your best on the Algebra 1 Regents exam! Pack a small snack to eat before the exam. Some great “brain foods” include nuts, blueberries, pumpkin seeds, and dark chocolate.

What NOT to bring to the Regents Algebra 1 Exam

  • Cell phones: The New York State Education Department exam administration directions prohibit students from bringing cell phones and other personal electronic devices to their Regents exam rooms.

    If you’re caught using a cell phone during the exam, your test might be invalidated. Play it safe and leave all cell phones, MP3 players, and other electronic devices at home.
  • Review notes and cheat sheets: The time to study is over. You’ll have access to the official Regents Algebra 1 reference sheet during the exam, so leave your other Regents review packets and study materials outside the examination room.
  • Scrap paper: Students are not permitted to bring their own scrap paper to the exam. But don’t worry! The Regents Algebra 1 exam booklet includes a piece of perforated graph paper for students to use while taking the exam. You may also write in the blank spaces in your exam booklet. Just remember, any work you show on your scrap paper will not be scored.

Return to the Table of Contents

What reference sheets are given for Algebra 1 Regents?

The Best Algebra 1 Regents Review Guide for 2022 | Albert Resources (13)

Students will have access to the Algebra 1 Regents reference sheet for the entire exam. Don’t spend too much time memorizing the quadratic formula or the conversion rate between gallons and liters. This information — and more — will be provided for you in the reference sheet in your exam booklet.

Here’s the thing:

Just having access to these formulas is not enough to pass the Algebra 1 Regents exam. Take the time to familiarize yourself with the formulas on the reference sheet and practice using them in application questions.

We’ve studied trends in released Algebra 1 Regents exams to see how the formulas from the reference sheets are used in the test. With this information, we’ve built a practice companion for the Algebra 1 Regents reference sheet.

Spend some time getting comfortable using these formulas and equations. Check out our reference sheet guide where we detail the formulas, what to think when you see them, and give you practice questions to try applying them yourself.

Do you think you’re ready to put the Algebra 1 Regents reference sheet to good use?

See if you can answer the following questions:

  • How do you find the height of a triangle or parallelogram?
  • Which part of a circle is the radius?
  • What kind of triangles does the Pythagorean theorem work for?
  • How do you notate the terms of a sequence?
  • When do you use degrees and when do you use radians?

If you’re struggling with those questions, the Algebra 1 Regents reference sheet might not do you much good. Spend some time with our practice companion to build your confidence using the formulas and equations.

How many questions do you need to get right to pass the Algebra 1 Regents test?

As of 2014, students’ Algebra 1 Regents exams are graded on a five-tier scale:

Performance Level

Scale Score

Description

5

85-100

Exceeds Common Core expectations

4

80-84

Meets Common Core expectations

3

65-79

Partially meets Common Core expectations; meets NYS graduation requirements

2

55-64

Does not meet Common Core expectations or NYS graduation requirements

1

0-54

Does not demonstrate knowledge and skills needed for Level 2

So, to pass the Algebra 1 Regents exam, you need to reach Performance Level 3 with a scale score of at least 65.

The scale scores for the Algebra 1 Regents are based on a curve that changes each year. This curve depends on many factors, including the difficulty of the questions and the skills assessed on a given test. It’s also based on the number of credits you earn on the test, which is called your raw score.

Based on the New York State Education Department score conversion charts from January 2020, August 2019, and June 2019, you need a raw score of about 27 to achieve the scale score of 65.

How do you get a raw score of 27?

Remember, the Algebra 1 Regents exam is made up of four distinct parts where questions are worth a different number of credits:

  • Part I: 24 MCQs, each worth 2 credits
  • Part II: 8 CRQs, each worth 2 credits
  • Part III: 4 CRQs, each worth 4 credits
  • Part IV: 1 CRQ worth 6 credits

So, there are 86 total credits on the exam. To get a raw score of 27, you need to earn 27 of these credits.

Here’s the thing:

It doesn’t matter where these credits come from. You could hypothetically get 14 multiple choice questions correct for a raw score of 28 and pass the exam without ever looking at Parts II, III, or IV.

Of course, many students want to do more than simply pass the exam. Students hoping to achieve the prestigious Regents Diploma with Honors designation need to average at least 90% on their ELA, math, science, social studies, and pathway regents exam. For the Algebra 1 Regents, students must earn at least 78 of the 86 possible credits to obtain a 90%.

Return to the Table of Contents

How do you find out your Algebra 1 Regents score? When do scores release?

The Best Algebra 1 Regents Review Guide for 2022 | Albert Resources (14)

You’ll receive your Algebra 1 Regents exam score from your school or the school at which you took the Regents exam. Your school might choose to display your score on an online student portal or as part of your report card. It will also appear on your high school transcript.

For specifics on where to find your Regents exam score, talk to your teachers, guidance counselor, or school administration.

The time it takes to receive your Algebra 1 Regents exam score depends on your school as well. If you’re feeling impatient, remember that a lot needs to happen in order for you to get your score.

According to the NYSED Directions for Administering Regents Examinations, at least three different teachers must score your Constructed Response Questions to make sure your scores are accurate. Plus, a random sample of machine-scored answer sheets need to be verified by hand as well. Once all exams have been scored, school administration starts sharing exam scores with students and their families.

Feeling anxious about when and how you’ll get your Algebra 1 Regents exam score? On the day of your exam, ask your test administrator how long it will take for your score to be ready and how you can access it.

To see how you might have scored, try out our free Algebra 1 Regents score calculator.

Can you retake the Regents exam?

Did you not pass the Algebra 1 Regents exam on your first try? Are you just not thrilled with your score?

Don’t sweat it.

You can retake the Algebra 1 Regents exam as many times as you’d like.

However, keep in mind that your school might not offer the Regents examination at all three opportunities in January, June, and August. Additionally, your school might not let you retake an exam that you’ve already passed to try to increase your score.

In these cases, you might need to speak to your guidance counselor or administrator to register for the exam at another school or testing facility. Make sure you register far enough in advance — you would hate to miss the August examination and have to wait 5 months to take the next test in January!

Want to know the best part? Your highest Algebra 1 Regents exam score — not your most recent score — will be counted on your transcript. Check out one of our Algebra 1 Regents study plansto maximize your next Regents score!

Important Dates to Remember for Algebra 1 Regents Exam (+ downloadable)

The Best Algebra 1 Regents Review Guide for 2022 | Albert Resources (15)

When is the Algebra 1 Regents Exam? Complete Schedule

The New York Department of Education administers Regents exams three times a year, typically in January, June, and August. Knowing this is important because this means students have three opportunities to score as high as they can in a school year: once at the beginning of the year, at the midpoint, and at the end of a standard academic calendar.

The Algebra 1 Regents exam is typically an earlier exam in the Regents testing schedule. We reviewed the last five years of Regents testing going back to 2016 and found two testing patterns:

  1. The Algebra 1 Regents exam most commonly falls into the afternoon slot of the second or third day of testing for January and June test days. Students recently took the Algebra 1 Regents exam at 1:15 PM on Wednesday, January 22, 2020. Their next opportunity for the math test will be 1:15 PM on Thursday, June 18, 2020.
  2. The August test date for the Algebra 1 Regents exam is scheduled for 8:30 AM on Thursday, August 13th, 2020. Looking back the last five years, the Algebra 1 exam has consistently been set in the first testing slot of the two-day August Regents testing schedule.

Looking ahead to 2021, the state has set next year’s Regents testing windows as January 26-January 29th, June 16-June 25, and August 12-13.

If trends follow, that means the Algebra 1 Regents exams will likely be scheduled for:

  • 1:15 PM on January 27th, 2021
  • 1:15 PM on June 17th, 2021 or June 18th, 2021
  • 8:30 AM on August 12th, 2021

Check back on this page though as we’ll update when we know more.

Here’s a table of the Regents Algebra 1 exam schedule:

Exam Cycle

What Day is it?

What Time is the Test?

2020 Cycle 1

January 22nd, 2020

1:15 PM

2020 Cycle 2

June 18th, 2020

1:15 PM

2020 Cycle 3

August 13th, 2020

8:30 AM

2021 Cycle 1

January 27th, 2021

1:15 PM

2021 Cycle 2

June 17th or June 18th, 2021

1:15 PM

2021 Cycle 3

August 12th, 2021

8:30 AM

Return to the Table of Contents

Algebra 1 Regents Review Notes and Practice

What are popular Algebra 1 Regents teacher notes and resources?

We scoured the web for the best Algebra 1 regents review notes and practice, and put together our top picks here:

The Best Algebra 1 Regents Review Guide for 2022 | Albert Resources (16)

New Visions for Public Schools’ Algebra 1 Page: This provides a ton of great content for teachers to plan with their students. Many of the exercises integrate with Google Classroom making it a great plug-and-play option for classroom activities as they’re aligned to the New York Common Core Learning Standards.

  • Use this site for: More interactive lessons and review planning for Algebra 1 classes. The spiraled practice provides opportunities for students to demonstrate comprehension by writing explanations for every problem.
  • Don’t use this site if: You’re looking for tons of practice materials. This site is more helpful for conceptual reviews.

The Best Algebra 1 Regents Review Guide for 2022 | Albert Resources (17)

NYSMathRegentsPrep.com: This site was created in 2016 by Trevor Clark, a math tutor who spent over five years tutoring students to prepare for the Regents Algebra 1 test.

  • Use this site for: Detailed video explanations for previously released Regents exams. Trevor has created video solutions for Regents Algebra 1 tests dating back from June 2014 to August 2018.
  • Don’t use this site if: You haven’t yet started working through the previously released Algebra 1 tests. Trevor’s site is ideal for when you are looking to check for understanding or need a visual explanation of how to work through a problem.

The Best Algebra 1 Regents Review Guide for 2022 | Albert Resources (18)

Miss Kajfasz’s Site: This math teacher from McKinley High School posts class notes, homework, and general review materials for helping with Algebra 1 review.

  • Use this site for: More exhaustive old-school practice. Most of the uploaded files from Miss Kajfasz’s site are answer keys where you’ll need to be comfortable working backwards from the solution.
  • Don’t use this site if: You only feel comfortable studying from the start of a problem. Most of this teacher’s site are answer keys for things she has given her actual class.

The Best Algebra 1 Regents Review Guide for 2022 | Albert Resources (19)

Common Core Algebra 1 Regents Review Packet: To be honest, we weren’t all that impressed by the resource options on TeachersPayTeachers. Most of them fall into the camp of repackaging previously released tests that you can get for free and add little to no additional value. That being said, this packet stood out and was reasonably priced at $6.

  • Use this review packet for: A 40-page overview of every topic covered in Algebra 1 including worked through examples from past exams. Ideal for last-minute review.
  • Don’t use this resource if: You already feel confident on the overarching topics covered in Algebra 1 Regents and simply are looking for practice questions. We’ll tell you what to use in the next section for a more seamless study experience.

Need help preparing for your Algebra 1 Regents exam?

Albert has a number of Algebra 1 Regents practice tests for you to practice with!

Unique from other Regents prep sites, Albert not only provides access to the previously released Regents tests, but also includes original New York Algebra 1 Regents practice questions. Create your free account today.

Start your Regents test prep here

Finally, if you found this resource helpful, you’ll also like our Algebra 1 Regents Study Tips or our 30-day Algebra 1 Regents study guide.

The Best Algebra 1 Regents Review Guide for 2022 | Albert Resources (2024)
Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Van Hayes

Last Updated:

Views: 5954

Rating: 4.6 / 5 (66 voted)

Reviews: 81% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Van Hayes

Birthday: 1994-06-07

Address: 2004 Kling Rapid, New Destiny, MT 64658-2367

Phone: +512425013758

Job: National Farming Director

Hobby: Reading, Polo, Genealogy, amateur radio, Scouting, Stand-up comedy, Cryptography

Introduction: My name is Van Hayes, I am a thankful, friendly, smiling, calm, powerful, fine, enthusiastic person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.